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News stories tagged with "weather"

Cool it! More summer yet to come

Parts of the North Country saw 40-degree weather over the weekend. The National Weather Service calls this "unseasonably cool." Martha Foley has more.  Go to full article

Storm topples trees, power lines and tractor trailer

Several thousand customers are without power this morning around the North Country and Vermont following severe storms last night. The fast moving storm knocked down trees and power lines and caused a tractor trailer crash on the Northway. Authorities say the northbound lanes of I-87 were closed shortly before 5 pm after strong winds toppled the tractor trailer. No injuries or deaths were reported in connection with the storm. Donnie Dumont is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Burlington.  Go to full article
Lightning strikes (Source:  NASA)
Lightning strikes (Source: NASA)

Heard Up North: Thunder

This Heard Up North is something we hear a lot in the summer: Thunder. Recent stormy weather inspired Brian Mann to record some of the more dramatic moments. And, to get an idea of what we're hearing, Jonathan Brown talked to National Weather Service meteorologist Maureen Breitbach.  Go to full article

Water woes in the garden

Martha Foley talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about mulching, watering and fertilizing during dry spells.  Go to full article

Keep the garden moist when it's dry

Martha Foley and Amy Ivy of the Cornell Cooperative Extension discuss watering the garden as we still await a good soaking.  Go to full article
Dr. Cameron Wake
Dr. Cameron Wake

Climate Change will alter Northeast

40 scientists from across the Northeast have collaborated to project the region's climate through the end of the century. The conclusion of the Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment, released last June, is that the very character of the Northeast is in danger. Cameron Wake is one of the team's co-leaders. He's a researcher at the University of New Hampshire's Climate Change Center. Wake told David Sommerstein the scientists used two future scenarios.  Go to full article
Reseacher Steve Long is growing crops in the atmosphere of 2050.
Reseacher Steve Long is growing crops in the atmosphere of 2050.

Climate Change: Will CO2 help farms?

For years, researchers studying the effects of climate change on agriculture have focused on two big issues: the availability of water and the impact of increasing carbon dioxide levels in our atmosphere. Carbon dioxide released from our cars and factories is the number one cause of global warming. But scientists have long theorized that more of the gas in the atmosphere could actually help grow bigger plants. New research is challenging that assumption. David Sommerstein went to the breadbasket in Illinois to learn more.  Go to full article

Call-in on regional climate change

Local weather and natural observations recorded for the region over many years give support for the claim that the North Country mirrors the rest of the world in experiencing a warming climate. What might that mean for the environment, the economy, and our way of life? Martha Foley, paleoclimatologist Curt Stager and physicist Aileen O'Donoghue discuss the possibilities and take calls from listeners.  Go to full article

Spring fire season sparks brush blazes

State officials have raised the fire danger in the Adirondack North Country to "high." Local fire squads and forest rangers with the Department of Environmental Conservation have already battled more than a dozen brush fires from Altona in Clinton County to Argyle in Washington County. The biggest blaze burned fifty acres over the weekend in the Flat Rock State Forest in Clinton County. A fire on the summit of Cobble Mountain in Warren County drew more than fifty firefighters. Brian Mann checked in with forest ranger Captain John Streif, who says all open burning should stop until fire conditions change.  Go to full article

Inuit tell of warming Arctic

The Arctic is among the regions hit hardest by early climate change. Inuit artists from Nunavut, Labrador and other Arctic territories are eyewitnesses to warmer winters. They gather in Ottawa twice a year for meetings of the Inuit Art Foundation. Lucy Martin spent an afternoon with the artists last April. They told her their lives are already changing. Note: The Inuit Art Foundation artists return to Ottawa for their "Arts Alive" celebration this Saturday, April 21, from 10 to 4.  Go to full article

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