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News stories tagged with "weather"

The Invasion of the Tent Caterpillars

Martha Foley and Amy Ivy talk about the eastern and forest tent caterpillar outbreaks across the region, and the best choices for top soil in their weekly gardening chat.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: Clearing Brush

It's the eternal struggle of every homeowner in the North Country. How to keep the fast-growing thicket of weeds and brush from taking over the yard? Burn bans have made the task especially daunting this spring. The ban's been lifted, for now. People are burning grass and clearing brush. Here's today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: A Cold Swim in the Oswegatchie

It was a chilly, rainy 45 degrees yesterday afternoon in DeKalb. That didn't stop three St. Lawrence University students from using the rope swing on the Oswegatchie River near Coopers Falls. Zach Turner, Kevin Daly, and Wade McDonald are today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Bill McKibben
Bill McKibben

Global Warming, North Country Style

The debate over global warming and climate change has, for the most part, ended. It's for real. Last week's cover of Time Magazine screamed "Be worried, be very worried". Environmental writer Bill McKibben has been saying that since the late 1980s, when his book The End of Nature sounded one of the earliest alarms about global warming. McKibben's also a practiced student of North Country ecology. He lives part-time in the southern Adirondack town of Johnsburg. McKibben sat down with David Sommerstein to envision what the North Country might be like in a warmer world. He says it's already happening.  Go to full article
Bob Andrews on his farm.
Bob Andrews on his farm.

A Year on the Farm: It's Management, Dummy

Spend time around a dairy farm, and you'll learn a lot about the farmer who owns it. Some barnyards are muddy and chaotic, others immaculate and organized. Some farmers get obsessed with grazing, or breeding perfect heifers, or using bugs to fight disease on their fields. Some love big tractors, others hate 'em. David Sommerstein's doing a year of stories on everyday dairy farming with Bob Andrews, who farms near Gouverneur. Bob's a manager.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Springtime Snow

It's Spring Break week in parts of the North Country. That means hundreds of people have fled south, looking for sunshine and warm weather. Those of us left behind are slogging through another winter storm. Brian Mann took a stroll through slushy Saranac Lake and sends today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Wildfires Plague North Country

Local fire squads and New York state forest rangers across the North Country have responded to more than a hundred grass and forest fires this spring. Light rain, combined with a thin snow pack and high winds have left many areas tinder dry. Fire experts say most of the wildfires have been triggered by burn barrels or by people setting fire to chaff in their fields. A ban on open burning went into effect yesterday in St. Lawrence County. Fire officials in the rest of the region are strongly discouraging people from setting open flames. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Slush and Mud?But Spring Skiing's Great!

A forecast of high winds, rain and fog is enough to deter most of us from stepping into cross-country skis. But Emily Tyner, who lives in the Lake Clear-Paul Smiths area, says this is her favorite season for skiing. She spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article

Heard up North: Tupper Lake Nursing Home Evacuated

A nursing home in Tupper Lake had to be evacuated last night after the boiler system failed, leaving the building with no heat on one of the coldest nights of the winter.
Patients at Mercy Healthcare Center in Tupper Lake were transported to Sunmount, a nearby mental health facility.
They spent the night on beds and mattresses laid out in the Sunmount community room. 94-year old Rita Chaisson described the experience.  Go to full article
Assemblywoman Teresa Sayward (Official photo)
Assemblywoman Teresa Sayward (Official photo)

National Grid Faces Anger After "Slow" Storm Clean-Up

National Grid officials say all but a handful of homes and businesses in the north country should have electricity restored, six days after a windstorm swept New York state. The storm caused outages to more than 300 thousand homes and businesses and killed at least two people. In the Champlain Valley and the Adirondacks, shelters were set up for displaced families. National Grid now faces growing criticism from local leaders for their response to the storm. State assemblywoman Teresa Sayward, a Republican from Willsboro, has complained about the response to the state's Public Service Commission. Sayward told Brian Mann that many locals no longer trust National Grid to provide reliable service or to provide accurate information during a crisis.  Go to full article

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