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News stories tagged with "wheelchair"

Counties demonstrate disability accessible voting machines

New York State has lagged far behind the country in replacing its lever voting machines. Now New York's counties are scrambling to comply with their part of HAVA - the Help America Vote Act. Each county has leased at least one machine to make it easier for people with disabilities to vote. But with so few machines, access will be a major issue. Gregory Warner went to a demonstration of the machines in Canton.  Go to full article
At the demonstration in Potsdam.
At the demonstration in Potsdam.

Trials of an Iditarod Hopeful

Tomorrow 56 men and women and their dogs will take off for the 1200 mile Iditarod sled dog race from Anchorage to Nome, Alaska. Organizers call it "the last great race on earth". It can take years of training, not to mention an $1850 entry fee, just to get to the starting line.

A St. Lawrence County man is training for a future Iditarod. His road to Alaska will be more challenging than most. Angelo Suriano is paralyzed from the waist down. He wants to be the first disabled musher to run the race. David Sommerstein has this profile.

To help fund his effort, Suriano can be reached at iditarod_hopeful2005@yahoo.com  Go to full article

Handcycling Clinic in Watertown

Handcycling is becoming a booming sport and the predominant way for a person in a wheelchair to get a good aerobic workout. Todd Moe talks with Dr. Jon Franks, elite wheelchair triathlete, about handcycles and fitness training for the disabled. Franks is the featured speaker Thursday at the North Country Access Cycling event in Watertown.  Go to full article
Mobility Engineering's Snowpod in action.
Mobility Engineering's Snowpod in action.

Mobility Engineering Helps the Physically-Disabled To Go Where None Have Gone Before

David Sommerstein talks with Peter Rieke, founder of Mobility Engineering, a business that builds adaptive mobility devices for people with physical disabilities. Rieke was the first wheelchair user to scale Mount Rainier. He's in Potsdam today to collaborate with grad students at Clarkson University.  Go to full article

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