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News stories tagged with "white-nose"

This sign is going up at more caves around the U.S.
This sign is going up at more caves around the U.S.

Deadly bat disease threatens wildlife and a passionate caving community

White nose syndrome, the deadly bat disease, continues to spread across the eastern U.S. As more caves become infected, more questions are being asked about the sport of caving, or "spelunking." Federal scientists are urging cavers to stay out of caves and mines until more is known about how white-nose is spread. But many cavers say a ban on the sport is premature. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Mollie Matteson (Source: Center for Biological Diversity
Mollie Matteson (Source: Center for Biological Diversity

As "white nose" syndrome spreads, green groups want more funds for bat research

On Thursday morning in Washington DC, the House Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on "white nose" syndrome. The mysterious ailment was first identified in upstate New York. It has since spread across the Northeast, killing hundreds of thousands of bats. Green groups are urging Congress to commit millions of dollars for new research and response efforts. Brian Mann spoke with Mollie Matteson in Richmond, Vermont. She's with a group called the Center for Biological Diversity.  Go to full article
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle (Source:  Brian Mann)
A bat in Vermont's Aeolus Cave frozen in icicle (Source: Brian Mann)

Scientists battling "white nose" bat disease prepare for worst

The mysterious ailment called "White-nose Syndrome" continues to decimate bat populations across the Northeast. A new outbreak was confirmed earlier this month in New Hampshire and the disease has spread as far as West Virginia. Scientists have begun collecting tissue from infected caves, here in the North Country and in Vermont, creating a genetic record of bat colonies that could vanish completely. As part of a collaboration with public radio stations across the Northeast, Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Little brown bats carpet the floor of Aeolus Cave in southern Vermont.
Little brown bats carpet the floor of Aeolus Cave in southern Vermont.

White nose syndrome spreading

Scientists are still scrambling to understand the mysterious bat ailment known as white nose syndrome. The disease is spreading fast, with new outbreaks confirmed in New Hampshire earlier this month and suspected in West Virginia. Todd Moe spoke with NCPR's Brian Mann who's been covering this story. He spent yesterday in a cave on Aeolus Mountain in southern Vermont.  Go to full article
Al Hicks inspects a bat for white nose syndrome.
Al Hicks inspects a bat for white nose syndrome.

New breakthrough in study of "white nose" bat disease

Researchers in New York state and around the country have made a major breakthrough in their study of "white nose syndrome." That's the mysterious ailment that's been killing thousands of bats (including endangered Indiana bats) in New York, Vermont, and around the Northeast. NPR's Dan Charles reported on the study; Brian Mann was in the cave with New York's top specialist, Al Hicks.  Go to full article

"White nose" syndrome spreads fast, alarming scientists and environmentalists

Scientists say a deadly disease that has ravaged bat populations in northern New York and Vermont is spreading faster than expected. Federal researchers have confirmed fresh outbreaks of "white nose syndrome" in Connecticut and eastern Vermont on the far side of the Green Mountains. They now suspect that the ailment may have reached caves in Pennsylvania. Researchers fear that some species of bats could be wiped out. As Brian Mann reports, pro-environment groups say the government should be doing more to protect the animals. NOTE: Jonathan Brown contributed to this report.  Go to full article
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)

"White-nose" syndrome kills Northeastern bats

Wildlife researchers across the Northeast are scrambling to understand a mysterious ailment that is killing thousands of bats, including rare Indiana bats, which are on the endangered species list. "White-nose" syndrome has been found at sites in New York and Vermont. And on Friday, scientists identified a new, infected cave in Massachusetts. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is now urging people to stay out of caves across the region. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)

"White-nose" syndrome kills Northeastern bats

Wildlife researchers across the Northeast are scrambling to understand a mysterious ailment that is killing thousands of bats, including rare Indiana bats, which are on the endangered species list. "White-nose" syndrome has been found at sites in New York and Vermont. And on Friday, scientists identified a new, infected cave in Massachusetts. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is now urging people to stay out of caves across the region. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

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