Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "white-nose-syndrome"

Mollie Matteson (Source: Center for Biological Diversity
Mollie Matteson (Source: Center for Biological Diversity

As "white nose" syndrome spreads, green groups want more funds for bat research

On Thursday morning in Washington DC, the House Natural Resources Committee will hold a hearing on "white nose" syndrome. The mysterious ailment was first identified in upstate New York. It has since spread across the Northeast, killing hundreds of thousands of bats. Green groups are urging Congress to commit millions of dollars for new research and response efforts. Brian Mann spoke with Mollie Matteson in Richmond, Vermont. She's with a group called the Center for Biological Diversity.  Go to full article
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)

"White Nose Syndrome" remains mysterious bat killer

The mysterious "white nose syndrome" has received a lot of media coverage. But little is known about the fungus linked to the deaths of thousands of bats across the northeast. Anxiety is growing over the fate of the animals, one of the region's most effective predators of mosquitos and other insects. Frustration is building among scientists over the slow march toward answers about the cause and possible prevention of the disease. Jonathan Brown talked to the biologist leading the state's effort to learn more about white nose syndrome.  Go to full article
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)
White fungus marks the muzzles of many sick bats (Photo: Al Hicks, NYSDEC)

Bat disease delays construction of North Country wind farm

White nose syndrome has killed tens of thousands of bats in New York. The disease has spread to Vermont, Massachusetts and Connecticut, as well. It spread quickly among bats as they huddled together, hibernating in caves over the winter. Researchers found whole colonies, dead, with a puzzling white fungus around their snouts.
Surviving bats are now hunting insects from summer roosts in eaves and trees, as scientists scramble for answers about what killed so many so quickly. Biologists are particularly worried about the impact of 'white nose' on Indiana bats, already on the U.S. endangered species list. The developer of a proposed wind farm in Jefferson County is now holding off on construction as researchers scramble to find out what effect wind turbines have on the bats. Jonathan Brown reports.  Go to full article

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

« first  « previous 10  15-38 of 17