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News stories tagged with "wildlife"

Will cougars occupy caves and cliffs in the Adirondack woods (Source:  Brian Mann)
Will cougars occupy caves and cliffs in the Adirondack woods (Source: Brian Mann)

Protect the Adirondacks seeks reports of cougars

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (AP) An environmental group has started a database of public sightings of cougars in the Adirondacks in an effort to determine whether there's any truth to rumors that have circulated over the years about the big cats.  Go to full article

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Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration.  Photo:  Costa Boutsikaris.
Adirondack biologist Nina Schoch bands a Saw-Whet Owl near Lake Placid during fall migration. Photo: Costa Boutsikaris.

Fall migration's special rewards

The fall migration is underway, a great time for birders to be outdoors watching the skies and treetops. Todd Moe spoke with Lake Placid bird watcher Larry Master about what he's seeing on his farm: lots of sparrows and finches. It's also a great season for up-close-and-personal views of birds -- Master is hosting a crew of birders busy banding Saw-Whet owls this week.  Go to full article

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Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nosuchuser/4152475705">feral godmother</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: feral godmother, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Animal hearts

From worms to whales, most creatures have hearts. In a worm it's a simple tube, in a whale it can pump 60 gallons of blood per minute.

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the variety of hearts in the animal kingdom.  Go to full article
Bicknell's Thrush.  Photo:  Jeff Nadler
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Jeff Nadler

Adirondack birder says summer visitors are in short supply

A Long Lake birding expert is doing her part to keep track of the Bicknell's Thrush, a rare songbird that nests on top of mountains in the Adirondacks, New England and Canada. And that often means getting out of bed in the pre-dawn hours.

Joan Collins says scientists have predicted that 98 percent of the thrush's U.S. habitat could be lost due to climate change. Experts have already documented annual population declines of nearly 20 percent in parts of the bird's range.

Todd Moe talked with Collins about her spring and summer early morning birding treks on Whiteface Mountain. She tracks the Bicknell's thrush, and many other species on the mountain, for a bird monitoring survey as part of Mountain Birdwatch, a volunteer science initiative run by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. Collins says the woods are quiet this summer and bird numbers are down.  Go to full article
Monarch larva feed on Milkweed, which grows in abundance along North Country roadsides. Photo: Wikipedia
Monarch larva feed on Milkweed, which grows in abundance along North Country roadsides. Photo: Wikipedia

Adk group fights to protect Monarch butterflies from road mowing

A non-profit group in the Adirondacks is urging highway departments to avoid mowing roadsides whenever possible over the next two months.

The group Adirondack Action says mowing can disturb areas used by Monarch butterflies as part of their summer reproduction cycle.  Go to full article
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo: BRI's Adk Center for Loon Conservation
Researchers Rick Grey and Nina Schoch weigh an adult loon. Photo: BRI's Adk Center for Loon Conservation

Adirondack loon sentinels lack funding this summer

For 15 years, researchers have been keeping an eye on loons in the Adirondacks to make sure their nests stay safe. But a funding shortfall means much of that monitoring may not happen this summer.  Go to full article
Porcupine up a tree. Archive Photo of the Day: <a href="http://wizenedeye.com">Judy Andrus Toporcer</a>
Porcupine up a tree. Archive Photo of the Day: Judy Andrus Toporcer

Natural Selections: Porcupines

Dr. Curt Stager tells co-host Martha Foley why and how porcupines climb trees--and why it can be a dangerous job. Plus, what to do when one lives under (and gnaws on) your porch. Get up close, but not too close, to porcupines.  Go to full article

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