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News stories tagged with "wildlife"

Going underground in search of endangered Indana bats.
Going underground in search of endangered Indana bats.

Endangered Species In A Cold Season: Tracking Indiana Bats In The Champlain Valley

The North Country's frosty spring is a nuisance for humans, but for wildlife the cold weather can be deadly. Researchers in the Adirondacks say bats are especially vulnerable. The tiny animals are just emerging from their caves weak and hungry after a long winter's hibernation. As Brian Mann reports, scientists are keeping a close watch on "Indiana" bats - an endangered species found in the Champlain Valley.  Go to full article

Unraveling Mystery Of Birds' Night Calls

Many North American birds are in serious decline. But scientists aren't sure what's wrong because birds are hard to count. The problem is partly that birds often migrate long distances between wintering sites and summer breeding grounds. Usually they fly unobserved at night. And in many cases scientists don't know what route they take. However, a new technique promises to solve this problem. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Daniel Grossman has our story.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Cowbirds

Cowbirds are one of the few birds to parasitize other birds' nests. Martha and Curt discuss its habits.  Go to full article

Trout Season Opener: The Joys of Cold, Frustration

Yesterday was the first day of trout season. It was cold and blustery, but Brian Mann decided to shake out his tackle box and go stand by the Saranac River for a couple of hours. Brian didn't catch any fish, but he tells us it was a great excuse to hang around in bait shops on a Monday afternoon.  Go to full article

Loon Study

Researchers in the Adirondacks are working to learn more about the common loon. The latest field study is raising questions about mercury contamination in the lakes and ponds where the loons live. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Ephemeral Wetlands

Biologists are becoming concerned about the disappearance of a habitat for wildlife that can be found in rural areas, in sprawling suburbs, and even in cities. The Environmental Protection Agency is trying to get city planners, farmers, and developers to stop draining small marshy areas that biologists call ephemeral wetlands. The EPA says in the rush to save big areas of wetlands these small temporary wet spots have been overlooked at the expense of some unique wildlife. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham has more.  Go to full article

Hummingbirds: The Tropical Connection

Martha Foley talks with naturalist Bill Hilton Jr. about how to protect hummingbirds in North America and the tropics. Hilton is Executive Director of the Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History in South Carolina. He'll give a lecture at 4:00 this afternoon in St. Lawrence University's Hepburn Auditorium.  Go to full article

Wildlife Corridor Would Strengthen Parks; Study Says Locals Would Fight Project

Students at Clarkson University presented a new report yesterday on a proposed wildlife corridor that would link the Adirondack Park and Ontario's Algonquin Provincial Park. The study found that the corridor would help animals making the trip between the two parks. But the report also says the idea will draw fierce resistance from private landowners. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Chipmunks

Curt Stager talks with Martha Foley about the chipmunks that live around his home, and he explains how to have them eating out of your hand.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Deer Adaptation

Over the next few months fawns will be born. What adaptations do they have to survive and how long do they stay with their mother.  Go to full article

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