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News stories tagged with "wine"

Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/willia4/1404659376/sizes/z/in/photolist-398fi7-8qsmXC-8qskUN-8qsdZS-8qp4Mz-8qp6Dt-8qskw5-8qsedf-8qp51n-8qskHo-6JTJWs-cf4Wd-8qsev1-8qp7kc-8qp4gc-8qp7Kv-8qskhW-6WFbeN-6WFvUw-6WF8wQ-6WFx5W-6WF5Aj-6WFmxN-6WBB7t-6WF4Ds-6WB9Lr-6WBhJ4-6WEMoW-nranY-8jcWGr-6WBzmP-jkEHiw-8sZ2r4-6WETe3-6WAXqi-6WAZZM-6WAYHD-jRPPB-dhtdSE-6WBxNB-5vbfnS-ap8PTw-4uLHVP-5H49Dy-dR7Pi5-7e64j3-8n9vQm-cmFNP-ahspds-6fuGEB-7BGpw3/">James Williams</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: James Williams, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY: Wineries can import grapes to bolster harvest

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) New York authorities will allow wineries to buy grapes and juice from out of state to make up shortages after a harvest expected to be well below normal because of last winters' harsh weather.  Go to full article
Dan Hollister conducts a tasting. Photo: Sarah Harris
Dan Hollister conducts a tasting. Photo: Sarah Harris

Bella-Brooke winery: a stop on the St. Lawrence County Wine Trail

St. Lawrence county isn't a big wine destination -- at least, not yet. But a New St. Lawrence County Wine Trail could change that. Governor Cuomo signed a law last week that establishes the St. Lawrence County wine trail. It includes 3 wineries in Black Lake, Lisbon and Winthrop, and it goes past the brewery in Canton.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/willia4/1404659376/sizes/z/in/photolist-398fi7-8qsmXC-8qskUN-8qsdZS-8qp4Mz-8qp6Dt-8qskw5-8qsedf-8qp51n-8qskHo-6JTJWs-cf4Wd-8qsev1-8qp7kc-8qp4gc-8qp7Kv-8qskhW-6WFbeN-6WFvUw-6WF8wQ-6WFx5W-6WF5Aj-6WFmxN-6WBB7t-6WF4Ds-6WB9Lr-6WBhJ4-6WEMoW-nranY-8jcWGr-6WBzmP-jkEHiw-8sZ2r4-6WETe3-6WAXqi-6WAZZM-6WAYHD-jRPPB-dhtdSE-6WBxNB-5vbfnS-ap8PTw-4uLHVP-5H49Dy-dR7Pi5-7e64j3-8n9vQm-cmFNP-ahspds-6fuGEB-7BGpw3/">James Williams</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: James Williams, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Could a new law "kneecap" NYS boutique wines?

Bottles of wine and spirits made in New York would have to sit in a New York state warehouse for up to 48 hours before they could be sold, under a new law being considered in Albany.

It sounds like a small thing, but for many wineries and distilleries, it's big.
In a letter this week, the Doolittles, of Frontenac Point Vineyard in Trumansburg, write the "at rest" legislation would make it prohibitively expensive for small operations to deliver wine to downstate accounts. They're part of a larger movement to defeat the bill.  Go to full article
Meglomaniacs Winery in Ontario's Niagara wine country. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/7815007@N07/5412521212/">Ken Whytock</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Meglomaniacs Winery in Ontario's Niagara wine country. Photo: Ken Whytock, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Ontario: farmers' market can sell wines made with local grapes

Ontario is joining British Columbia in relaxing provincial liquor laws to allow homegrown wines to be sold at farmers' markets.

Premier Kathleen Wynne says VQA wines -- which are made only with Ontario grapes -- will be available alongside seasonal vegetables and fruits.  Go to full article

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The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wine and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The North Country has almost two dozen wineries. The state legislature recently designated an Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to draw attention to a pocket of vineyards near Lake Champlain.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking" - breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot. David Sommerstein reports from a vineyard in the Thousand Islands.  Go to full article
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy <a href="http://claytondistillery.com/">Clayton Distillery</a>
Clayton Distillery in the Thousand Islands is part of the locavore distillery trend -- it produces distilled products from locally grown grains and fruits. Photo courtesy Clayton Distillery

Craft distilleries are the latest in the locavore trend

As people turn away from mass-produced products, demand is growing for locally produced food, wine and beer.

In upstate New York this trend is also reaching the field of craft distilleries, and the state is seeing a comeback of the small, artisan liquor operations of the pre-prohibition era.  Go to full article
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry

Are the Finger Lakes the place to store natural gas?

It's something few people think about, but all the natural gas and other fossil fuels being produced by hydrofracking have to be stored somewhere before they get to the consumer. Often used for the job: underground salt caverns like the ones near Watkins Glen in the Finger Lakes.

Now an out-of-state company wants to expand storage there, a plan some local residents call risky.  Go to full article
A still from a promotional video for the Adirondack Coast. Image: goadirondack.com
A still from a promotional video for the Adirondack Coast. Image: goadirondack.com

Champlain Valley wineries get official recognition

Amid Wednesday's flurry of action in Albany, a bill passed that creates an official Adirondack Coast Wine Trail. According to the New York State Wine and Grape Association, more than five million people visit New York wineries every year.

The Adirondack coast in question is on Lake Champlain. The designation highlights seven wineries and a cider mill in Clinton County.

And there's room for more, says Colin Read, co-owner of Champlain Wine Company and North Star Vineyard. He told David Sommerstein the area chamber of commerce has a map and website for the new wine trail.  Go to full article
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein
The Northern Grape Project's test vines at Coyote Moon winery, Clayton. Photo: David Sommerstein

North Country wines survive the cold, please the palate

The New York wine industry is booming. According to the New York Wind and Grape Foundation, five million people visit New York wineries every year. The industry generates almost $4 billion.

The New York Farm Bureau is pushing for an official designation for a new Adirondack Wine Coast Trail to bring enthusiasts to seven vineyards in Clinton County.

A lot of the credit for New York wines can go to a team of researchers that's doing what you might call "extreme winemaking": Breeding grapes that survive the North Country's frigid winters and still make delicious wine.

They hope names like Frontenac and Marquette will one day be as popular as Cabernet and Merlot.  Go to full article

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