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News stories tagged with "wolves"

Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/64894594@N08/7046599793">abuakel</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: abuakel, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Listen: Wolf howl sound check

You just heard a public wolf howl at Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario. But that event can only take place if park naturalists actually hear wolves the night before, during what they call a "sound check."

So on the night before the "public howl", teams of naturalists spread through the park, scouting the area and keeping in touch by handheld radio. It was past ten in the evening. The August night was clear and still, and the sky dripped with meteors. That's today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdbsound/3968088234/">JDB Photos</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: JDB Photos, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Howling for wolves

The Eastern Timber Wolf lived across the eastern United States before humans virtually erased it from the landscape. But in some parts of Canada, the Eastern Wolf is alive and well. And every August for the past fifty years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear its howl. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.  Go to full article
Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/64894594@N08/7046599793">abuakel</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Nighttime in Algonquin Park. Photo: abuakel, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Listen: Wolf howl sound check

You just heard a public wolf howl at Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario. But that event can only take place if park naturalists actually hear wolves the night before, during what they call a "sound check."

So on Wednesday night last week, teams of naturalists spread through the park, scouting the area and keeping in touch by handheld radio. It was past ten in the evening. The night was clear and still, and the sky dripped with meteors. That's today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Wolves have helped strengthen several species of plants and animals in Yellowstone National Park. (Photo by Marlene Foard)
Wolves have helped strengthen several species of plants and animals in Yellowstone National Park. (Photo by Marlene Foard)

Wolves bring subtle benefits to Yellowstone

The idea of reintroduction of wolves to the North Country has faded in recent years because of biological and political hurdles, though it continues to be the dream of some environmentalists. A controversial reintroduction program did go forward in Yellowstone National Park in the mid-90s, and wolves are now reestablished there after an absence of almost 70 years. According to the Yellowstone website, packs are now found in various parts of the park. Since the wolf returned to Yellowstone, the predator's had wide-ranging and unexpected effects on the ecosystem of the park. As Kinna Ohman reports, top predators such as wolves might be more important than biologists had realized.  Go to full article

Wolves Retain Endangered Species Protection

A federal judge in Montpelier, Vermont, says the Bush administration can't take gray wolves off the endangered species list until the animals return to the Northeast. Gray wolf populations have rebounded in the Great Lakes and the Rockies. As Brian Mann reports, some pro-environment groups want to reintroduce the predators in Maine, Vermont, and New York.  Go to full article

Timber Wolves Moving Into New Area

Timber wolves are moving into an area where they haven't been seen for about 80 years. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Lester Graham reports.  Go to full article

Gray Wolf Protections Reduced

The federal government has downgraded the Gray Wolf from "endangered" to "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. The move reduces the amount of federal protection for Gray Wolves. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Mark Brush has more.  Go to full article

Biologist Devotes Life to Island Wolves

It's been a cold winter this year, especially for Rolf Peterson. Peterson is a wildlife biologist who studies wolves and moose on Isle Royale. Every year starting in January Peterson spends several weeks on the island at the northernmost spot in Michigan surrounded by the frigid waters of Lake Superior. The environment is harsh, but Peterson says it's the best time to observe wild animals, and as the Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Gretchen Millich reports, as his research has uncovered some of our most basic knowledge about predators and their prey.  Go to full article

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