Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "work"

The Farm Bill focuses on workers like these in the Champlain Valley (Brian Mann)
The Farm Bill focuses on workers like these in the Champlain Valley (Brian Mann)

NY farm worker bill stirs debate, controversy

One of the bills tangled up in the NY Senate meltdown is a controversial measure that would give far more legal rights to New York farm workers. Senator Pedro Espada has been pushing the bill, which would allow farm laborers to unionize more easily. It would also guarantee workers at least one day of rest each week and provide for overtime pay. The bill has strong backing from a variety of labor, immigrant and religious groups, including New York's State Catholic Conference.

But the Farm Bureau and most of the North Country's Albany delegation opposes the bill. In a statement released this week, Democratic state Senator Darrel Aubertine said the bill would force many farms to close down. "I thought we had put this bill behind us for this session," Aubertine wrote, "but now Senator Espada has listed it among his priorities."

We checked in with another lawmaker who opposes the bill. Assemblywoman Teresa Sayward is a Republican and a former dairy farmer from Willsboro. Sayward told Brian Mann that Federal agriculture laws already provide farm workers with enough protections. She called the rules in this proposed law unrealistic.  Go to full article
Rep. Scott Murphy (D-Glens Falls)
Rep. Scott Murphy (D-Glens Falls)

Rep. Murphy co-sponsors controversial Employee Free Choice Act

Representative Scott Murphy has co-sponsored his first set of legislation, since taking office a little more than a month ago. Today and tomorrow, we'll talk with the new Democratic Congressman from Glens Falls about his agenda in Washington. One of the first bills that Murphy is backing is the Employee Free Choice Act. It would allow unions to organize workers without a secret-ballot election, if a majority of employees sign a union card. Business groups and most Republicans have slammed the measure for eliminating the secret ballot. But Murphy says he thinks it would give important new clout to workers. He spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

North Country lay-offs get personal

Melinda Little has been a private business owner and entrepreneur in Saranac Lake for years. Last February, she took a job with the American Management Association, a national management training company with offices in Saranac Lake. But then, in late October, Little was laid-off. She was hit by the wave of jobs cuts and hiring freezes that has swept companies and government agencies across New York state. According to a study released last week by the state Comptroller's office, another 225,000 jobs could be lost statewide over the next year. Melinda Little agreed to sit down with Brian Mann to talk about what it's like to be on the receiving end of a lay-off. She also offered some advice for how workers can prepare if they think their job is at risk.  Go to full article
Everett Smith, at work.
Everett Smith, at work.

Heard Up North: splitting wood

There were clear skies, cool temperatures...and a woodpile. A perfect combination for our Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Brett Rogers photo
Brett Rogers photo

A long Valentine's Day For the plowmen

We've been hearing about the emergency workers and road crews who've been hard at work the last couple of days, digging out from the Valentine's Day snowstorm. The guys on the front line of that effort are the plow drivers who worked round the clock struggling to keep roads and highways open. Brian Mann hitched a ride for a couple of hours on a plow in Saranac Lake. He sent this audio postcard.  Go to full article

It's Not the Work, It's the Wages

Much of the growing public discourse on immigration policy assumes America needs foreign workers to do the grunt work. Commentator Paul Willcott disagrees.  Go to full article
George Howard.
George Howard.

Disability Matters: Everday Challenges in Getting Around

How many times have you heard this: "If you don't have a car, you can't get around in the North Country." Buses are few and far between. Taxis are scarce and expensive. Most towns are not designed with the pedestrian in mind. It can takes hours, or even a whole day, to run an errand or make an appointment that in a car would take minutes. And limited transportation options restrict job opportunities. For people with disabilities, and especially people who use wheelchairs, these problems are magnified. Accessible vans and ambulettes are plentiful for Medicaid funded trips to the doctor or case manager. But there are few - if any - options for the errands and visits and excursions of everyday life. People with disabilities are too often restricted to their homes, isolated from and invisible to their communities. As part of our series Disability Matters, David Sommerstein reports on one man's efforts to get around on his own.  Go to full article

Commentary: What is Work?

On this Labor Day, commentator Paul Willcott reflects that the way we see work in our society doesn't match the way many people actually do work.  Go to full article

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

These aren't the droids you're looking for...

Sorry, but the story you've requested isn't available right now.

« first  « previous 10  11-30 of 18