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News stories tagged with "world"

Former Ugandan child soldier and founder and executive director of Friends of Orphans Ricky Richard Anywar meets with Clarkson University students in Uganda. (photo: Clarkson University)
Former Ugandan child soldier and founder and executive director of Friends of Orphans Ricky Richard Anywar meets with Clarkson University students in Uganda. (photo: Clarkson University)

Moving the world: from child soldier to community servant

In our occasional series, Moving the World, we meet people who share their skills, expertise and resources with communities around the globe. Ricky Richard Anywar has survived his share of trouble. At 14, he was abducted by Joseph Kony's Lord's Resistance Army in Uganda and forced into slavery as a child soldier. His family was killed by the LRA. But Anywar escaped two years later. Despite what he calls an "interrupted childhood," he earned a college degree. That led to work with the Ugandan Ministry of Education. For more than 10 years he has worked to give back to his native Uganda by empowering and reintegrating former child soldiers.

Anywar is founder and executive director of "Friends of Orphans," or FRO, which pays the school fees for former child soldiers and young mothers. It runs vocational programs, counseling groups, and HIV/AIDS clinics. Clarkson University is working with FRO to help establish a community-based radio station. A group of Clarkson business students visited Uganda and the site for the proposed radio station in May.

Todd Moe spoke with Ricky Richard Anywar last week during his visit to Clarkson. He was on campus to speak to students and faculty about rebuilding war-ravaged northern Uganda.  Go to full article
<i>Eastern Wind</i> dancers at last year's "Night of Nations" in Plattsburgh.
Eastern Wind dancers at last year's "Night of Nations" in Plattsburgh.

SUNY Plattsburgh celebrates international education, awareness

SUNY Plattsburgh is celebrating International Education Week with a series of workshops, lectures, debates and the "Night of Nations" cultural showcase on Saturday. Todd Moe talks with Student Association president, PJ Shah, an international student from Nepal, about the lure of attending college in Plattsburgh.  Go to full article
Chloe Erickson
Chloe Erickson

Moving the World: building community resources in Morocco

In our occasional series, Moving the World, we meet North Country people who take their skills, expertise and resources to share with communities around the globe. Paul Smiths College hosts the founder of the Atlas Cultural Foundation, which helps Moroccans in one of the poorest regions of North Africa. Atlas is affiliated with Adirondack Sustainable Communities, which promotes healthy development in our region. Todd Moe talks with Chloe Erickson about her group's efforts to help improve community health, cultural preservation, education and literacy. She'll give a lecture tonight (7 pm) in the Freer Hall Auditorium at Paul Smiths College.  Go to full article
Jacob Edgar, surrounded by his passion for music.
Jacob Edgar, surrounded by his passion for music.

World "Music Voyager" brings tunes back home

Tonight kicks off a four-part world music concert series at the Higher Ground in Burlington. The Summer Global Music Voyage features bands from South Africa, the Saharan desert, Parisian cafes via San Francisco, and tonight, from Peru.

The series is tied into a new TV show about world music called Music Voyager. Its host and co-producer is a Charlotte, Vermont resident. David Sommerstein has this profile.  Go to full article
Alan Leo in Ghana.
Alan Leo in Ghana.

Moving the world: empowering a knowledge of economics

Our Moving the World series continues as we talk with a Canton man who volunteers with the U.S. Agency for International Development. Alan Leo recently returned from Ghana where he worked with a group of farmers on organizing their day-to-day operations and the economics of farming. Leo, who grew up on Long Island, has been doing international development work for more than a decade, and his volunteerism has taken him all around Africa, Asia and eastern Europe. He told Todd Moe that his travels and overseas work have taught him that people are the most important part of economic development.  Go to full article
Manotick Brass Ensemble: (l to r) Martin Luce, Christine Hansen, Bob Weaver, Harold Floysvik and Kaz Samujlo.
Manotick Brass Ensemble: (l to r) Martin Luce, Christine Hansen, Bob Weaver, Harold Floysvik and Kaz Samujlo.

Moving the World: Sharing a love of music in Cuba

Although it's just 90 miles from Florida, Cuba maintains closer diplomatic relations with Canada than the United States. Today, about half of Cuba's tourists are sun-starved Canadians.

Tomorrow, a group of Ontario musicians heads to the Caribbean. Members of the Manotick Brass Ensemble, in partnership with a local Cuban church, will visit Cuba for a series of free concerts. The Canadians are also donating musical instruments to a group of students in Cuba.

Lucy Martin spoke with one of the group's founders about the trip. Kazimier Samujlo says Cubans don't need any help when it comes to making music. But, he says, between the U.S. trade embargo and Cuba's own economic woes, it's tough to find decent band instruments.  Go to full article
Alex French and some of the residents of Gembeltu, Ethiopia
Alex French and some of the residents of Gembeltu, Ethiopia

Exploring a new culture, lending a helping hand

A SUNY Potsdam alumnus successfully raised $20,000 this year to help build a school in a small east African community. Alex French travels back to Gembeltu, Ethiopia this winter to help with some of the finishing touches on the school, and to talk with government leaders who've promised to provide a small yearly budget and a modest salary for the teachers. Todd Moe spoke with Alex French for an update on his humanitarian work in Africa as part of our series, Moving the World.  Go to full article
Alex French and some of the residents of Gembeltu, Ethiopia
Alex French and some of the residents of Gembeltu, Ethiopia

Hospitality and a helping hand in Ethiopia

It started with a dirt bike ride to visit a friend's family and is now a quest to build a school in Ethiopia. Alex French, a SUNY Potsdam alumnus, spent part of last year living and working in the east African country. It was a side trip to the small community of Gembeltu, difficult to find on most maps of Ethiopia, that inspired him to give back. As part of our series, Moving the World, Todd Moe spoke with French about exploring a new culture and lending a helping hand.  Go to full article

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