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News stories tagged with "world-war-two"

Bob Noody (second from right), a bazooka man from Fox Company, 101st Airborne, on the night of June 5, 1944. Waiting for the C-47 to take off on the eve of D-Day.   Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/brevort/6035219135/">Doug Barber</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
Bob Noody (second from right), a bazooka man from Fox Company, 101st Airborne, on the night of June 5, 1944. Waiting for the C-47 to take off on the eve of D-Day. Photo: Doug Barber, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

Star Lake D-Day vet remembers: "scared stiff"

This Friday marks the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy during World War Two. Now a dwindling band of brothers, D-Day veterans -- in their late 80's and 90's -- will pause to remember the day with solemn reflection.

Star Lake veteran Robert Noody was a paratrooper on the eve of the D-Day invasion. He recently returned to France and was awarded the Legion of Honour, France's highest medal for military conduct. Noody is also the recipient of two Bronze Stars, two Purple Hearts, and is featured in an iconic D-Day photograph. Todd Moe spoke with him just before his return trip to England and northern France. Noody, 90, shared memories of the night the photo was taken, parachuting into France and tributes to his fallen comrades.  Go to full article
Sunday Rock is a landmark along Route 56 in South Colton.  Photo: Todd Moe
Sunday Rock is a landmark along Route 56 in South Colton. Photo: Todd Moe

Colton remembers its WWII history with music, dance, stories

The Sunday Rock Legacy Project continues in Colton this summer. It's a collaboration of the Grasse River Players, Colton Historical Society and Colton-Pierrepont Central School. Last summer, the three organizations produced Sunday Rock - The Folk Musical, written by Colton resident Evelyn Riehl. The project is committed to presenting a theatrical performance addressing an important historical era reflected in the local community. A two-part show opens Thursday night at Colton-Pierrepont Central School that will include vintage music, dance and local stories from World War II. Todd Moe spoke with Karen Wells, director of The 1940's Radio Hour.  Go to full article
Robin Collen, holding a wartime photo of her parents, with Hilda Nuttens in St. Martin de la Lieue, France.
Robin Collen, holding a wartime photo of her parents, with Hilda Nuttens in St. Martin de la Lieue, France.

Retracing her father's wartime footsteps

Veterans Day is this Sunday - a time to honor the service of all U.S. military veterans. A Potsdam woman traveled to a small village in France to retrace her father's footsteps during World War Two. Robin Collen's father, Leonard, served in the Army Air Corps. When his plane was shot down over France, he parachuted to safety and was rescued by local villagers.

As a child, Collen remembered tissue paper-thin air mail envelopes from France, and occasional war stories from her dad. When her father died in 2000, he left behind a map and note about the experience and his French rescuers.

A few years ago, after some web research, Collen says she was curious and determined to revisit her father's past. She and her husband, Bruce, traveled to rural France to try to connect with one of the women who helped hide her father from the Nazis more than 60 years ago. She wrote an essay to honor his experience and shared her thoughts with Todd Moe.  Go to full article
Susan Stein plays Etty Hillesum. Photo: Ricardo Barros
Susan Stein plays Etty Hillesum. Photo: Ricardo Barros

Preview: "Etty" in Morristown

Actor/writer Susan Stein combed through the diary and letters of Etty Hillesum, a Jewish student who lived in Amsterdam during the Nazi occupation of Holland during World War Two, and her one-woman play Etty is based on those diaries.

Stein will perform the play at St. John the Evangelist Church in Morristown on Wednesday at 7:30 pm. She spoke with Todd Moe.  Go to full article
The story of Navajo code talkers (above) is well known. But Native American soldiers speaking Mohawk, Chochtaw, Commanche and other native languages also helped to win the war.
The story of Navajo code talkers (above) is well known. But Native American soldiers speaking Mohawk, Chochtaw, Commanche and other native languages also helped to win the war.

Mohawks seek recognition for WWII code talkers

A Mohawk veterans group wants the federal government to recognize the contributions of "code talkers" during the D-Day invasion of Europe during World War Two. The Navajo "code talkers" were the largest group of Native Americans during the 1940's to use their language skills in the south Pacific against the Japanese.

Jeffrey Whelan, a member of the St. Regis Mohawk Veterans Affairs Committee, says many other tribes participated as "code talkers" during the war. He says the St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Council has sent a letter of request to the U.S. Mint to develop a Congressional Medal for nine veterans at Akwesasne who used their native language to confuse the Germans.  Go to full article
The 1941 Lake Placid High School men's ski team.  Peter Roland, Sr, is fifth from the right.
The 1941 Lake Placid High School men's ski team. Peter Roland, Sr, is fifth from the right.

Whiteface honors early ski pioneers

Seventy years ago today, a group of young skiers climbed Whiteface Mountain to build the first racing shelter at the top of what is now known as Wilderness Trail. Later that day, they came down the mountain to find out that Pearl Harbor had been bombed by the Japanese. Many went on to join the military in the early years of World War Two.

Whiteface will honor the men on Sunday with a special ceremony that will include lectures and historical displays. While most of those pioneers of alpine skiing on Whiteface and that fateful day are gone, their stories and memories live on through their children and friends. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article

Commentary: Remembering "V-mail"

It's the same in every war. Soldiers send their love and thoughts back home. The only thing that changes is the "how." Commentator Renate Wildermuth recently came across "V-mail" from World War II.  Go to full article
Norwegian merchant sailors memorial in Pine Ridge Cemetery.
Norwegian merchant sailors memorial in Pine Ridge Cemetery.

Norwegian sailors remembered in Saranac Lake

Tomorrow is a day of national pride for millions of Norwegians around the world and the North Country. It's the 17th of May, or "Syttende Mai." But it's not just Norwegians who pay tribute to Norway's Constitution Day. A quiet ceremony will take place Saturday morning at a small plot of graves in Saranac Lake's Pine Ridge cemetery. During WW II hundreds of Norwegian merchant sailors ended up in Saranac Lake as tuberculosis patients. 15 men, and the daughter of a ship's captain, died and were buried there. And a longtime cemetery volunteer has made it her mission to make sure they're not forgotten. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
Screen shot from <i>The Last Ridge</i>
Screen shot from The Last Ridge

The uphill battle of the 10th Mountain

A new documentary about Fort Drum's 10th Mountain Division debuts Sunday at 7pm on WPBS in Watertown. The Last Ridge: the Uphill Battles of the 10th Mountain Division uses vintage film footage, first-person accounts, and on-location reenactments to bring to life the 10th Mountain's role in World War 2. NPR's Scott Simon is the narrator. Abbie Kealy directed, wrote, and produced The Last Ridge. She told David Sommerstein it's the story of the division's daring assault on the German front in the mountains of northern Italy in 1945.  Go to full article
Yvonne Todd and her mother, Emma Westdijk
Yvonne Todd and her mother, Emma Westdijk

StoryCorps: life in Indonesia during World War II

Conversation by conversation, interview by interview, StoryCorps is collecting the stories and voices of our time. After two weeks on the village green in Canton, the StoryCrops MobileBooth is now at Flower Memorial Library in Watertown. While the studio was in Canton, Yvonne Todd interviewed her mother, Emma Westdijk, about her life as a teenager in Indonesia during World War Two.  Go to full article

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