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News stories tagged with "writing"

Kristen serves breakfast to the crew at Essex Farm (Photo:  Brian Mann)
Kristen serves breakfast to the crew at Essex Farm (Photo: Brian Mann)

Chronicling the Dirty Life of a North Country farm

It's not easy managing a small organic farm in the Adirondack Mountains. It's even more complicated managing that farm while also writing a book about the experience.

Kristen Kimball, author of The Dirty Life, has managed that double feat and her new book is drawing national attention.

Kimball farms in the town of Essex with her husband Mark. This week, she spoke about how farming redefined her life with Melissa Block, host of NPR's All Things Considered.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article

One story, many writers

Writers have been busy adding their thoughts, words and plot spins to an on-line writing project this season. The Adirondack Center for Writing's Nathalie Costa Thill talks with Todd Moe about the community writing project, "Adirondack Summer Shorts: And then what Happened?" It's a collaborative short story open to contributions from everyone. Since June, we've followed the adventures of Carl and Charlene on their summer trip to the Adirondacks. Writers pick up the story where a previous writer left off. Nathalie Costa Thill says the community writing project is a big success.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article
Verlyn Klinkenborg taught a seminar at Paul Smiths College over the weekend
Verlyn Klinkenborg taught a seminar at Paul Smiths College over the weekend

The Rural Life: A conversation with the New York Times' Verlyn Klinkenborg

When it comes to writing and thinking about rural America, no one is more influential than Verlyn Klinkenborg.

Klinkenborg runs a small farm in Columbia County, New York, and sits on the editorial board of the New York Times.

His "Rural Life" column may be the mostly widely read chronicle of small-town and farm culture in the country.

Klinkenborg was in the North Country over the weekend for a writing conference hosted by Paul Smiths College and the Adirondack Center for Writing.

He sat down on the shore of Upper St. Regis Lake and spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

It takes a community to write a story

People from around the region are collaboratively writing a short story this summer. The Adirondack Center for Writing's Nathalie Costa Thill talks with Todd Moe about a new community writing project that needs your input. "Adirondack Summer Shorts: And then what Happened?" is an on-line story that invites contributions from everyone. Follow the adventures of Carl and Charlene on their summer trip to the Adirondacks. You pick up the story where a previous writer left off. Nathalie Costa Thill says art and much of writing is collaborative.  Go to full article

The search for new writing talent

New writers who want to break into the book publishing world are invited to the 2010 Adirondack Writing Summit at the Woods Inn in Inlet, August 15th-26th. It's a program designed to help aspiring writers and those who want to boost their career to new levels. It'll include daily coaching classes, one-on-one sessions with editors and publishers and interviews with bestselling authors. Todd Moe spoke with David Hazard, the summit's coordinator, who says the program is being held in the Adirondacks because it's one of the most inspiring wilderness areas in the country.  Go to full article
Dennis Aprill passed away unexpectedly on Saturday
Dennis Aprill passed away unexpectedly on Saturday

North Country loses two outdoor advocates, Ed Ketchledge & Dennis Aprill

Ed Ketchledge was a prominent teacher and naturalist who helped found the Summit Steward program on the High Peaks.

Dennis Aprill was the outdoor columnist for the Plattsburgh Press-Republican, who also wrote popular guidebooks.

Brian Mann has this remembrance.  Go to full article
Chuck Brumley
Chuck Brumley

Saranac Lake author Chuck Brumley: 1940-2010

We'll say goodbye now to a friend. Chuck Brumley, of Saranac Lake, was 70 years old. He passed away last week.

Chuck was an avid outdoorsman, and a guide. He was a musician and a writer. He wrote often about his love for the Adirondacks and his adopted hometown of Saranac Lake. His books include "Guides of the Adirondacks: A History," and a collection of stories: "Ripples from the Paddle."

He also wrote and recorded commentaries for North Country Public Radio -- always with a touch of humor. In 2003, Chuck wrote this -- about guiding tourists in the Adirondacks.  Go to full article
<em>Short Carries</em> by Elizabeth Folwell
Short Carries by Elizabeth Folwell

Folwell chronicles her Adirondack life, one vignette at a time

For thirty-nine years, Adirondack Life magazine has chronicled the Park's history and culture. For half of that time, Betsy Folwell from Blue Mountain has been one of the magazine's leading writers and editors. Folwell's new collection of essays is called Short Carries. It offers a kind of public journal, written by one of the Adirondacks' keenest observers. Folwell, now creative director at Adirondack Life, sat down last week to talk with Brian Mann.  Go to full article

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