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News stories tagged with "year-of-the-floods"

Governor Andrew Cuomo has called for changes to the way New York plans for future floods (NCPR File photo)
Governor Andrew Cuomo has called for changes to the way New York plans for future floods (NCPR File photo)

Year of the Floods, Part Five: The Flood Next Time

During this pledge drive week, we've been looking back at the North Country's Year of the Floods, from the spring floods last April to the sudden devastation of tropical storm Irene.

By all accounts, the immediate response to the floods was swift and professional. That prevented loss of life and limited damage to property. But months later, the clean-up continues and long-term questions remain about future flooding.

In this final part of our series, Brian Mann looks at how families and towns are thinking about how to prepare for storms that some experts say could grow more frequent and more powerful.  Go to full article
Emergency crews faced widespread damage to infrastructure (NCPR file photos)
Emergency crews faced widespread damage to infrastructure (NCPR file photos)

Year of the Floods, Part Four: On the Front Lines of Disaster

This week during our pledge drive we've been looking back at the Year of the Floods. Spring rains last April sparked widespread flooding from the St. Lawrence Valley to the shores of Lake Champlain.

Then came the sudden, devastating blow of tropical storm Irene in August. Flash floods triggered by that storm destroyed dozens of homes, ripping out roads and power lines.

In this fourth part of our series, Brian Mann looks back at how the disasters tested emergency responders in the North Country like never before.  Go to full article
Irene brought sudden, awesome devastation to Keene, NY (Photo: Kathy Regan)
Irene brought sudden, awesome devastation to Keene, NY (Photo: Kathy Regan)

Year of the Floods, Part Three: Irene Comes Calling

During this pledge drive week, we're looking back at the North Country's Year of the Floods. We began with the spring rains and snow melt that sent rivers surging and drove Lake Champlain to historic flood levels.

That disaster unfolded slowly, beginning in April and lingering into early July. On August 29th, a very different kind of flood struck the region.

Tropical storm Irene landed like a hammer blow, triggering flash floods and devastating surges of debris. In this next chapter of our series, Brian Mann looks at those first hours of Irene, when wind and water brought chaos to whole towns.  Go to full article
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh (Photos:  Brian Mann)
Battling the rising water of Lake Champlain in Plattsburgh (Photos: Brian Mann)

Year of the Floods Part Two: The Fury of Lake Champlain

Yesterday we kicked off our pledge drive week with a look back at the North Country's Year of the Floods. Brian Mann reported on historic spring rains and snow melt that sent rivers across the North Country surging beyond their banks, ripping through mountain towns.

Much of that water flowed into Lake Champlain, triggering a secondary flood in communities in New York, Vermont and Quebec that lasted for weeks. This morning, we look back at how dozens of shore towns weathered the long crisis.  Go to full article
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield
Flood waters hit Tupper Lake. Photo: Jim Bission, Piercefield

Year of the Floods Part One: The Rivers Rise

During this membership drive week, we'll be looking back at the one big story that shaped much of our news coverage over the last twelve months, a series we're calling The Year of the Floods.

It's a story with two major chapters. Communities are still picking up the pieces from horrific flash floods in late August. But all that came AFTER what was the first record-setting flooding of 2011.

Beginning in April, torrential rains combined with heavy snowmelt, sparking weeks of flooding that caused tens of millions of dollars worth of damages. In part one of our series, Brian Mann looks at the historic rise of rivers last spring that triggered emergencies from Potsdam to Port Henry.  Go to full article

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