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News stories tagged with "youth"

Photo: Natasha Haverty
Photo: Natasha Haverty

Local residents respond to Amish girls kidnapping

It's been six days since the two Amish girls were kidnapped from their family's roadside vegetable stand. People in this rural part of St. Lawrence County have been living crime up close. Natasha Haverty spent some time in Hermon, where the alleged kidnappers are from. Yesterday, she spoke to residents there. She joined Todd Moe this morning.  Go to full article
Photo courtesy of Amy Moulton
Photo courtesy of Amy Moulton

What it takes to be Dairy Princess

This year St. Lawrence County celebrates the 50th anniversary of its dairy princess tradition--tonight in Madrid, at the annual pageant, a new princess will be crowned, and tomorrow morning she and her court will star in a parade through downtown Canton.

For the past half century, a group of judges has been selecting a wholesome young woman from the community to be the face of the local dairy industry. To become the dairy princess a girl has to be between 16 and 21 years old, and has to compete in a pageant where she is judged on her public speaking ability, her general poise, and her knowledge of dairy products.  Go to full article
From a Walk Against Rape. Photo: Steve Rhodes
From a Walk Against Rape. Photo: Steve Rhodes

National sex assault conversation echoes on North Country campuses

Last week, the White House's Task Force to Protect Students From Sexual Assault announced that colleges aren't doing nearly enough.

Its report rolls out a comprehensive list of steps to help colleges and universities do better: from how they assess the problem, to how to prevent it, to improving how a school responds when a student is assaulted, and getting all those resources out in the open.

The task force's report is turning up a national conversation, one that's happening on campuses right here on the North Country.  Go to full article
State education commissioner John King at a Common Core forum in Schroon Lake last fall. Photo: Ian Lowe, high school senior at Schroon Lake Central School, used by permission
State education commissioner John King at a Common Core forum in Schroon Lake last fall. Photo: Ian Lowe, high school senior at Schroon Lake Central School, used by permission

Legislators ask tough questions about Common Core

The State's Education Commissioner testified at a legislative budget hearing where he once again heard complaints from concerned lawmakers on the fast track adoption of the new national Common Core standards.  Go to full article
View from a subway platform in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the neighborhoods in New York city with the highest concentration of men and women admitted to prison. Photo: Natasha Haverty
View from a subway platform in Bedford-Stuyvesant, one of the neighborhoods in New York city with the highest concentration of men and women admitted to prison. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Cuomo: "reducing the madness of an incarceration society"

Cuomo also talked about the state of prisons in New York yesterday. And according to the Governor, there's good news, and there's bad news.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/visioplanet/4760316376/">Sudipto Sarkar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Sudipto Sarkar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Study finds NY 21st in funding to stop smoking

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) A national coalition of anti-smoking advocates ranks New York 21st among states in funding of smoking cessation programs.

The Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids this month also includes New York among states it says broke promises to use all or most of the money from the historic tobacco company settlement 15 years ago to combat smoking.  Go to full article
The Adirondack Express heading towards Penn Station. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/96536917@N00/8542793641/">P. Romaine</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.
The Adirondack Express heading towards Penn Station. Photo: P. Romaine, Creative Commons, some rights reserved.

Listen: Goodbye, hometown

It's travel time for a lot of people this week. But one family from the north country recently made a bigger journey than most--all the way to sunny California, and they did the whole trip by train. And they had a one way ticket, the family was making a new start on the west coast. Their mother was feeling shy, but the two brothers met reporter Natasha Haverty in the train's dining car. The 8-year-old Adam, and 15-year-old Julian, who was traveling with his guitar around his neck, are today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth

In NYS prison, women hold on to motherhood

In New York state's prison nursery program, a woman can qualify to live with her newborn baby for up to one year.

But during the many hours when their mothers have to attend programs like GED classes or addiction counseling, or work in the garment shop, these babies have another group of inmates who look after them. Each of these inmate caregivers has to go through a long training to have this job. And the majority of them are mothers themselves.

This morning, our Prison Time Media Project continues, with a profile of one caregiver at Bedford Hills, New York's maximum-security prison for women.  Go to full article
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty

When should babies stay with their moms in NY prisons?

The number of women in American prisons has gone up 800 percent over the last thirty years, according to the Federal Bureau of Justice. Most of these women are mothers. And about one in twenty of them are pregnant.

Here in New York State, a woman who gives birth while serving time has the chance to stay with her baby in a prison nursery, for up to one year, or eighteen months if the mother is eligible for parole by then.

A Department of Corrections study found that participating in prison nurseries lowers recidivism rates dramatically--cutting the chances of a woman coming back to prison in half.

Researchers say these programs also help the babies, giving them a chance to form secure attachments to their moms.

But in recent years, the numbers of mothers in the prison nurseries have gone down. In our latest installment of the Prison Time Media Project, reporter Natasha Haverty set out to learn why.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/54450095@N05/8598246170/"> Intel Free Press</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Intel Free Press, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

NY toughens up on texting behind the wheel

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has signed legislation that creates new, stiffer penalties for teenaged and new drivers who text while they're driving. The law will now treat texting as seriously as speeding or reckless driving.

It takes effect today.  Go to full article

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