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News stories tagged with "youth"

"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty
"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: Back in the world

Today, the final part in a series about society's efforts to turn away from long-term incarceration for nonviolent offenders. In Part one, we met Jeff, a college-bound young man from Western New York who fell into serious drug addiction, broke into a pharmacy, and cycled through drug courts and rehab for years before being sentenced to prison.

But instead of serving a four year sentence, Jeff went to Moriah Shock, a bootcamp-style, six-month program in the Adirondacks. We left off yesterday when Jeff was three months away from his release, and feeling confident his time in Shock would help him stay drug and crime-free when he returned home.

"I mean obviously I'm not going to walk around, I'm not going to march around and call cadence, but it helps establish certain discipline that's essential through the program, and this is from the heart, I'm not just speaking to build up the program because I know whatever I say is going to be fine."

In Part three, producer Natasha Haverty finds Jeff back in the world, rebuilding his life and looking ahead.  Go to full article
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Special report: A look inside Moriah Shock Prison

Two years ago, Moriah Shock Prison near Port Henry was next on the list of correctional facilities New York State wanted to close. Camp Gabriels near Saranac Lake and the Summit Shock Prison near Albany had already been shut down, and the prisons in Lyon Mountain and Ogdensburg were also on the chopping block.

But the local community and Essex County officials rallied enough support to keep Moriah open. Today, 188 men live on the spartan campus, set in a former mining facility at the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains.

Corrections officers and some inmates at Moriah Shock say the prison's program offers a fresh start to men willing to work hard. But a quarter-century after the state's "shock" program was created, the question of whether it really works remains unresolved.

[CORRECTION: Martin Horn was misidentified earlier as former commissioner of New York's Department of Corrections. He is former commissioner of New York City's Department of Correction and Department of Probation, and headed Pennsylvania's Department of Corrections.]  Go to full article
The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society
The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society

Heard Up North: Lecture hall becomes a wild forest

Last night veteran journalist Bill Blakemore gave the keynote presentation at St. Lawrence University's Climate Change Forum. That talk has been publicized all over the North Country, and Blakemore appeared on NCPR Thursday, so you may have known about that already. But chances are, you didn't know about the surprise flash mob.

Earlier in the semester, the organizing committee for the Forum asked St. Lawrence art professor Peter Nelson to come up with an installation related to the theme of climate change. But as Nelson was coming up with an idea, it dawned on him that the materials and energy needed to create a typical installation would be wasteful, and go against the whole spirit of the event. So instead, he came up with a way to transform Eben Holden Hall into a forest grove, using only the human voice.  Go to full article
The student center at St. Lawrence University.
The student center at St. Lawrence University.

Heard Up North: Looking for the heart of Saturday night

The student center at St. Lawrence University has a vaulted wooden ceiling and a wide column of open space down the middle, giving it the feel of an Adirondack concert hall.

Late on Saturday night, the bottom floor is noisy with groups of friends getting pizza or playing pool; the ground floor is dotted with pairs of students leaning into each other; and on the top floor, a few lone students are scattered in giant armchairs silently studying or texting. And on some Saturday nights, one young man comes up to the top floor and plays the piano.  Go to full article
Photo: Village of Massena
Photo: Village of Massena

Village of Massena may bring back youth curfew

The village of Massena is considering reviving a 40-year-old curfew. In the past couple decades, juvenile curfews have been challenged by groups like the American Civil Liberties Union and often failed constitutional tests in the courts. But the Massena police are confident that this one passes the test.  Go to full article
Obviously, what's been very frustrating for my office, is the fact that could he have been stopped 30 years ago.

Rape trial reveals past allegations

The rape trial of former Saranac Lake youth center director Michael Scaringe turned up allegations of sex abuse dating back to his teaching days in Tupper Lake in the 1970s. Franklin County's district attorney now says school officials knew of the allegations and apparently didn't report them to police. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article
Michael Scaringe. Photo: NY State Police
Michael Scaringe. Photo: NY State Police

BREAKING: Scaringe found guilty by Franklin County jury

UPDATE: Chris Knight reports from Malone that a jury found Michael Scaringe guilty of having sex with a 13-year-old girl at his home in Saranac Lake in December 2009.

The verdict came in just after 2 pm.

He was 61 at the time and was the director of a local youth center. That's where he met the girl.

Chris Knight will have more on this story Thursday morning during the 8 O'clock Hour.  Go to full article
The Dairy Princess float
The Dairy Princess float

Heard Up North: The Dairy Princess Parade

June is National Dairy Month, and this weekend was the annual Dairy Princess Festival and Parade. Despite the crummy weather, the hundreds of people who came out didn't look like they were feeling a drop.

Fire trucks, high school bands, girl scouts, politicians, local businesses and, of course, the Dairy Princess and her court rolled through town, throwing handfuls of candy all along the way. Tasha Haverty got to meet the parade's unofficial tallier of the floats, 11 year-old Ryan Nolan. They send us this postcard.  Go to full article

Keeping the Dairy Princess tradition alive, one farm daughter at a time

St. Lawrence County has had a Dairy Princess since 1964. Every year since then, a group of judges selects a wholesome young woman from the community to be the face of the local dairy industry.

To become the dairy princess a girl has to be between 16 and 21 years old, and has to compete in a pageant where she is judged on her public speaking ability, her general poise, and her knowledge of dairy products. Tasha Haverty takes us through this year's competition, and looks ahead to its future.  Go to full article
Paul Nojaim explained how his family-run grocery store in Syracuse will participate in the state's Youth Works program. Ryan Delaney /Innovation Trail
Paul Nojaim explained how his family-run grocery store in Syracuse will participate in the state's Youth Works program. Ryan Delaney /Innovation Trail

State promotes youth jobs program

The Cuomo administration is promoting a job hiring program for young people in some of the state's most economically hurting areas. The Innovation Trail's Ryan Delaney has details.  Go to full article

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