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News stories tagged with "youth"

The Bessera family, fishing on the Ogdensburg waterfront.
The Bessera family, fishing on the Ogdensburg waterfront.

Heard Up North: Fishing on the Dock of the River

With summer in full force, or at least as full as it's going to get this year, it's fishing time. Some vacationers visiting their grandparents in Ogdensburg took time to fish on the banks of the St. Lawrence for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article

Common Wealth, Common Wisdom: "These hands have..."

Last week, some North Country teenagers and senior citizens gathered to talk about life and labor in hard times. It's part of a summer workshop at NCPR called Common Wealth, Common Wisdom. We'll be hearing and seeing more from them over the next few weeks. For today, teens and seniors asked each other to tell stories about their hands.  Go to full article

Heard Up North: A Japanese card game in Massena

Go to the Massena Public Library on the first and third Saturdays of any month, and you'll find teenagers dueling, Yu Gi Oh style. Yu Gi Oh is a trading card game based on Japanese anime cartoons. It's like a Dungeons and Dragons for a new generation. James Roscha sponsors the regular tournaments. He and one of his Yu Gi Oh proteges are the subjects of today's Heard Up North. Sarah Minor produced this story.  Go to full article
Clarkson students Michael Gately, Tracy Roux, Max Edmands, with their adviser, Prof. Andrea Ferro.
Clarkson students Michael Gately, Tracy Roux, Max Edmands, with their adviser, Prof. Andrea Ferro.

Clarkson students host "green jobs" panel

Tonight in Potsdam, residents will join a national dialogue on climate change and the clean energy economy. "Focus the Nation" includes more than 100 town hall meetings organized by youth activists. The Potsdam event is tonight at 6:30 in the high school auditorium. It will feature a panel of energy efficiency experts and local business leaders. It was organized by students at Clarkson University. Tracy Roux, Max Edmands, and Michael Gately spoke with David Sommerstein. They say the focus of the discussion is sustainable economic development and green jobs.  Go to full article

"Return To Sender"?Julia Alvarez portrays illegal dairy farmworkers in young adult terms

Mexican and central American immigrants--most in this country illegally--have become a fixture on hundreds of dairy farms in northern New York and Vermont. In fact, they've become crucial to many farms' survival. Meanwhile, the farmers themselves, and their families, are in involved in a degree of illegality they're not used to. It's this underground world meeting sanguine farm life that's the backdrop for the latest novel by Julia Alvarez. It's a book for teen readers called Return To Sender. Alvarez is one of America's most famous Latina authors. She wrote How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents and In the Time of the Butterflies. Alvarez was born in the Dominican Republic, but she's lived the majority of her life in Vermont. She's taught at Middlebury College since the 1980s. She told David Sommerstein when she first moved to Vermont, there were very few latino faces.  Go to full article
K'Wuan Allen (left), with track teammates, Julius, and Chris Steele (right), who K'Wuan is staying with for the year.
K'Wuan Allen (left), with track teammates, Julius, and Chris Steele (right), who K'Wuan is staying with for the year.

When parents go to war, pt.2: K'Wuan relies on friends & faith

The ongoing pace of wartime deployments are forcing some families at Fort Drum to get creative. Single parents can send their children back home to grandparents or other relatives when called to duty. But sometimes their children don't want to leave their friends and schools around Fort Drum. Today we have a second story of military kids living in the North Country while their parents fight in a war zone. K'Wuan Allen's mother and father are in Iraq. To get by, he relies on the discipline of sports, close friends, and a dose of faith. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
Democrat Addie Jenne Russell and Republican Bobby Cantwell compete for the 118th "River District" Assembly seat.
Democrat Addie Jenne Russell and Republican Bobby Cantwell compete for the 118th "River District" Assembly seat.

Youth, positive campaign in 118th Assembly race

The vicious Aubertine-Renzi senate campaign in Jefferson and St. Lawrence counties has largely eclipsed a very different kind of race. Democrat Addie Jenne Russell and Republican Bobby Cantwell have run a cordial campaign for the 118th Assembly district. And they've made sure to include independent candidate Don Lucas, whose name doesn't even appear on the ballot. David Sommerstein has this profile.  Go to full article

Fighting teenage drug/alcohol abuse, one house at a time

Officials in an Adirondack school district have launched an anti-alcohol and drugs network. "Safe Homes" was unveiled at the start of the school year in Lake Placid and Wilmington. It gives parents a new way to build a network of home supervision for teens and their friends. Todd Moe has more.  Go to full article
FFA students from Uniondale...
FFA students from Uniondale...

Future farmers or not, they gather in Canton

Traffic is snarled and the motels are full in and around Canton. Canton central school is playing host to New York State's 83rd Annual FFA Convention. Almost a thousand students from 73 schools will get to know each other and learn about agriculture and a lot more. FFA used to stand for "Future Farmers of America", but that was dropped to be more inclusive of other pursuits. David Sommerstein joined the orchestrated chaos of registration yesterday and spoke with some students...  Go to full article

More young adults idle in rural towns

Young adults in small towns are more likely to be idle than young people in cities and suburbs. That's according to a new report produced by the Carsey Institute, a rural-policy think-tank based in New Hampshire. According to the study, the risk is especially high here in the Northeast. Roughly 40% of 18-24 year-olds who don't finish high school will find themselves out of work, unable to pursue a higher education or job training. Brian Mann spoke with Anastasia Snyder, a rural policy expert at Ohio State University and co-author of the study.  Go to full article

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