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About On the Media

Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone
On the Media, hosted by Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield, decodes what we hear, read, and see in the media every day, and arms us with critical tools necessary to survive the information age.

WNYCThe program is produced by WNYC, New York Public Radio, and is distributed by NPR.

You can support this program directly with a donation to On The Media.

 

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On the MediaNPR's On the Media
with Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone airs
Sunday from 10-11 am

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Recent items from the On the Media podcast
Aug 27, 2014 -

This is a repeat of TLDR #6,

In 1998 Swatch tried to completely reinvent our concept of time. Swatch Internet Time (or .beat time) would have been a new way to conceive of moments. There'd be no time zones, and also, no hours, minutes, or seconds. PJ talks to Gizmodo's Eric Limer and Swatch Creative Director Carlo Giordanetti about Swatch's plan to create time's version of Esperanto

Thanks for listening. If you like the show, you can subscribe to us on iTunes. Also, please check out all our previous episodes! If you're curious, you can calculate beat time on Swatch's website here.

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Aug 22, 2014 -

From Trayvon Martin to Michael Brown, how media coverage unspools. Also, the #ISISmediablackout after James Foley's murder, and how the music of reality TV manipulates viewers. 

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Aug 19, 2014 -

Steve Terrill is a journalist who works in Rwanda. Or at least he worked in Rwanda, until he accidentally got the office of Rwanda's president Paul Kagame to implicate itself in a long-running online harassment campaign. Alex talks to Steve about inadvertently exposing the Rwandan government's most prolific troll, and being banned from the country as a result.

Thanks for listening. If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. Steve Terrill aggregates stories about Rwanda on his website Rwanda Wire. You can follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. 

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Aug 15, 2014 -

How a virtual livestream of tweets and vines after the Michael Brown shooting changed coverage, remembering the first gavel-gavel coverage of a court case, and fact and fiction on Shark Week.

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Aug 10, 2014 -

A few weeks ago, writer Katie Notopoulos created a holiday called Unfollow a Man Day, wherein everyone (women and men) was encouraged to Unfollow a Man on social media. Men's rights activists were enraged, cable news was intrigued, and a lot of people felt quiet relief. This week PJ talks to Katie about her mission and her manifesto.

Thanks for listening. Katie wrote about her experience of Twitter without men, and about #UnfollowAMan, here. If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. You can also follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. 

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Aug 08, 2014 -

A special theme hour - starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army's recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots. 

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Aug 04, 2014 -

Last week, dating site OK Cupid put up a blog post describing experiments it conducted on its users. In one experiment, the site told users who were bad matches for one another that they were actually good matches, and vice versa. Alex and PJ talk to OK Cupid President and co-founder Christian Rudder about the ubiquity of online user experimentation and his defense of potentially sending OK Cupid's users on bad dates.

Thanks for listening. If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. Or you can follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. 

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Aug 01, 2014 -

How to parse early coverage of breaking news events, Norway's slow TV phenomenon, and a report on the streaming-video revolution.

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Jul 29, 2014 -

This is a repeat of TLDR #6. This episode contains some explicit language.

Before the Internet as we know it today, there were text-based bulletin board systems all over the country that people could dial into. One of those systems, M-net, happened to live in Alex's backyard, and it was his internet home base for the better part of a decade. Alex went back this week and found out that it's actually still running.

Thanks for listening, and if you like the show, subscribe to it on iTunes. If you want other people to hear it, please rate and review it! If you want to check out our previous episodes on our website, you can listen here. If you like our theme song, you can hear more by Breakmaster Cylinder here.

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Jul 25, 2014 -

A breaking news consumer's handbook for plane crashes, the challenges of choosing the right words in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and humor when the news is bleak. 

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Jul 21, 2014 -

Whether you think the internet is a great or terrible place is partly a reflection of which parts of the internet you choose to visit. It's also a reflection of who you are, and how people online react to you. Mikki Kendall is a writer who deals with an extraordinary amount of trolling and vitriol online. Mikki is a black woman in real life, and she created an experiment to see how her online life would change if she were a white man. 

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