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About On the Media

Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone
On the Media, hosted by Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield, decodes what we hear, read, and see in the media every day, and arms us with critical tools necessary to survive the information age.

WNYCThe program is produced by WNYC, New York Public Radio, and is distributed by NPR.

You can support this program directly with a donation to On The Media.

 

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On the MediaNPR's On the Media
with Bob Garfield and Brooke Gladstone airs
Sunday from 10-11 am

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Recent items from the On the Media podcast
Apr 18, 2014 -

A special theme hour - starring a computer competing against a comedian for laughs, the Army's recruitment chatbot, and Google crushing on robots. 

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Apr 13, 2014 -

Continuing our expose into the very hush-hush world of Silence, we look at an app that promises to deliver you four minutes and thirty-three seconds of silence. PJ talks to Larry Larson, who helped design the 4'33" app.

 

Thanks for listening. If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. Or you can follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. Our favorite thing that we couldn't fit into this TLDR was this anecdote about John Cage and Merce Cunningham's relationship.

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Apr 11, 2014 -

A fond farewell to Stephen Colbert's character, remembering the genocide in Rwanda 20 years ago, and a report on the skin lightening industry.

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Apr 07, 2014 -

A band called Vulfpeck has asked fans to stream an entire album of silence on Spotify while they sleep, so the band can use the royalties to tour without charging for their shows. So far, the scheme has worked. We talk to Vulfpeck's Jack Stratton about hustling as a musician on the internet.

Thanks for listening! If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. You can follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. 

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Apr 04, 2014 -

A conversation with former FCC commissioner Michael J. Copps, communicating climate change to the public, and EU sanctions against Russia's chief propagandist.

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Mar 28, 2014 -

The Obamacare advertising blitz tries to reach the young and uninsured, the annexation of Crimea creates a dilemma for map makers, and the history of those ubiquitous online quizzes. 

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Mar 21, 2014 -

Russia's new propaganda war, not-so-private metadata, and the people with the keys to the internet.

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Mar 20, 2014 -

In 1966, a bored college freshman created Project Flame, an early computer dating system that promised to pair lonely hearts. Project Flame was an overnight sensation. The only problem was that the guy who founded didn't have a computer. Or any idea how to use one. 

Thanks for listening. We found out about Project Flame from an obscure weblog called Slate.com. If you like our show, please subscribe to us on iTunes. Or you can follow PJ and Alex and TLDR on Twitter. 

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Mar 14, 2014 -

How the media are covering the story of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight, the re-birth of the First Amendment, and copyright law in outer space.

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Mar 10, 2014 -

Sgt. Star is the army’s robot. Specifically, he’s a chatbot designed to influence potential recruits to enlist in the US Army. So how do we feel about that? Alex talks to the Army and a reporter who's covered recruitment abuses to figure out if we're better or worse off for having a Siri who can talk us into going to war.

Thanks for listening. If you like the show, you can subscribe to us on iTunes. Also, please check out all our previous episodes!

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Mar 07, 2014 -

The effort to preserve journalistic freedom during the Crimean crisis. Plus, Bob Garfield issues a special report on the streaming video revolution.

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more On the Media from NPR